Demarc 3.0

Back in the days of land-line phones, your demarc, or demarcation point, was the part of your house where the public utility phone network entered your home. Each outlet in your home connected here in what was called a POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) network, and connected to one or more lines going out of the house. Frequently this was located near where power entered your home, and later, cable TV. This makes it an excellent point to retro-fit tech into a house that maybe wasn’t designed with nerds in mind.

I know this looks a little crazy, but in version 3.0 of my setup, its much, much cleaner than its ever been. To quote Morpheus, this is the core where we broadcast our pirate signal and hack into the Matrix! This diagram might be a little easier to read:

There’s some really cool stuff in this architecture that I’m pretty proud of. On one hand, its a modern 1gbps network, with distributed 802.11N WiFi, that can filter out ads and pornography, and support remote connections via VPN. On the other, it can also connect any device from the early 1980s to other devices, or to the Internet.

For the very oldest machines, a Raspberry Pi Zero, running the DreamPi image, connects to our home’s POTS network (long since disconnected from the public phone network), inducing the correct voltage, and playing back a dial-tone sound. A Python script on the the Pi listens for an old-school modem trying to dial out, then plays back the handshake sounds of an ISP, then continues to pretend to be a modem, bridging the device onto our network (and thus the Internet.)

For 90s and 2000s era Macs, either physical Ethernet or an old Airport Classic, provide an on-ramp onto our network. The Airport is configured with a whitelist of allowed machine IDs, so that it can run with only WEP security (since that’s the best it can do!) A Performa provides an EtherTalk to LocalTalk bridge, and a PhoneNet ring running around the basement networks the earliest of Apple and Mac computers.

For newer devices, that have always-on Internet connections, another Raspberry Pi runs PiHole DNS, which filters out ads, with OpenDNS upstream, configured to filter adult content. Dubbed the NetPi, it also runs an OpenVPN server, giving us the same safety when we’re away from home. The NetPi, and a little media PC next to it, also host Plex Media servers that share our content with our devices, no matter where we are.

With more of the Internet abandoning HTTP for HTTPS (whether its needed or not) and newer SSL cryptography ruling out connections from machines with lesser cryptography libraries, the NetPi will probably be pressed into service again running a SSL-stripping Proxy. I haven’t quite figured out how to do this yet, but I do have a RSS+Site Scraper utility running, which means I can still read a lot of content on older devices.

Although this one wall in the house is a little complex, the tech is effectively invisible throughout the rest of the house. Ben and I are working on a Raspberry Pi project using a PowerBook from 1999 as the programming terminal, but the 2019 home theater can also stream 4k content — all without touching or re-configuring anything. I can literally start a document on a Mac Plus, revise it on a Performa, print it from there, or pick it up off a combined AppleTalk/SMB share on the NetPi and publish it to the web from my 2019 Surface Laptop. In fact, I sort of just did…

Update: Squid SSL Bump Proxy running!

So I Tied An Onion To My Belt – 2019 Edition

The start of 2019 required patience — sticking to the same patterns for nearly 4 years doesn’t come easy for me, but sometimes that’s best. Fortunately, we had our first escape in March: a couple’s vacation to Mexico with some great friends from college. Going somewhere just to relax is a relatively new experience, but it went well — aside for a couple days of Montezuma’s Revenge near the end!

When we got back, we started putting things in place for some needed changes. First, Nic got a new car, to keep us in shape for road trips to Canada. Then, after finally getting some clarity on professional transitions, we were able to nail down our summer plans. A July start for a new job meant that we got one more trip to Florida from my previous employer — and allowed me to stick around long enough to launch my second product.

After Nic and the kids were done with Universal Studios, I handed in my two-weeks notice, and we went off to Family Camp — during which I signed the final papers for my new job. We squeezed in one more little get-away with some friends at Darien Lake, then the kids were back to school and I was thrust into almost non-stop business travel. As a result, the fall was necessarily a little more quiet on the home front. Simpler things like tinkering with projects, going on Girl Scout trips, horse-back riding, and kayaking in our beautiful State parks provided small escapes from responsibility.

The best escape had to wait until the end of the year. Ben pushed through another challenging half school year, on the brink of becoming a teenager. To celebrate his 13th birthday, we planned a surprise trip to Disney’s Hollywood Studios, where he and I got to explore the new Galaxy’s Edge Star Wars land. An early morning got us into the brand new Rise of the Resistance ride, and let us see most of the rest of the park as well. Ben built a droid, we drank blue milk, and got to nerd out together on this, the last of his Star Wars birthdays.

We flew out, via Atlanta, where we met up with the girls, en route to Grand Cayman. There we spent a wonderful week with my parents, enjoying their sunny paradise. Nic and I got to try a scuba diving lesson, she and the kids got to play with some dolphins, and we all got to explore the coral reef as we snorkeled around 7 mile beach.

It was a wonderful cap on a pretty great year. 2020 will be an interesting one. Of course, we have some travel planned, having ended up in sort of an every-other-year pattern for some of our favorite adventures. But there will have to be new ones too. Our new teenager starts high school (a year early here) and we’ll have to figure out what makes the most sense for him — as well as thinking hard about what kinds of family experiences are important for our kids in the few years we have left with them.

For now, though, we’re happy and healthy in Ohio, and looking forward to what God leads us through in the next year. Family Photos have been updated — find the link and password hint on the home page.